Tag Archives: the basil druid original

From the Trees

This is sort of a meditation, sort of a practice of mindfulness, one I do as often as I can whenever I am in the presence of a tree, specifically the oak tree in front of my house.

When you find a tree you wish to perform this little activity with, simply observe the tree. What kind is it? How wide is it? How tall is it? How old do you think it could be? What condition is it in? How many branches does it have? Is it bearing blossoms or fruits? Gather as much of this information as you can (feel free to journal and sketch or take notes).

Once you’ve gathered as much about the tree’s appearance as you can, sit in front of it and lean back against it or simply face away from it. Take in everything around the tree. What other plants are nearby? Animals? Where is the tree located? In a yard or in a park? How close/ far is it from a water source? How close is it to other trees? Again, gather as much information as you can.

Now, look around. What does the tree see? What events might have taken place at the locations around the tree? What memories does the tree itself have? What has the tree had to do to survive? (Did it have to grow into concrete? Around electrical wires? Around a house or fence?). Take in as much as you can.

What lessons can you learn from this tree? Grow despite adverse conditions? Change with the seasons? Bend but don’t break during storms? There is a near endless possibility of lessons to learn. This mindfulness can be applied to anything within nature, then shifted to apply it to ourselves. We are, after all, a part of nature.

To me, this is one of the biggest lessons druidry has taught me. Take wisdom, find knowledge, find ways to learn from everyone and everything around me. I performed this meditation with the old oak tree (named Acornelius) in my front yard, and I find I relate very much to that tree.

I hope you all find some lessons from this act of mindfulness! Feel free to share feedback about what you’ve learned.

M.G.

The Basil Druid

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The Magic of Metal: Iron

Natural History and Folklore

Iron is possibly the most common metal in witchcraft. In general it is associated with repelling magic, demons, spirits and the fae. Iron makes up the major part of the inner and outer core of the earth. The atomic symbol for iron (Fe) comes from the Latin term for iron, which is Ferrum, whose root meant ‘to create, to form or to bear forth’. It is the sixth most abundant element in the universe and iron-oxide is belied to be the reason for Mars’ red surface.

Meteorites are largely made up of iron. Iron is also an important dietary nutrient for plants, animals and humans. The Iron Age succeeded the Bronze age, starting around 1200B.C. Iron is the second oldest metal known to man, the word iron coming from the Anglo-Saxon ‘iren’ which through time meant ‘holy metal’.

Iron has been found in historical sites the world over. In Egypt some iron artifacts have been found that contain a fair percentage of nickel, indicating that they were likely meteoric in origin. Some holy sites once never allowed items of iron make to be allowed inside due to their anti-magical/ spirit repelling properties.

Chemical Information/ Toxicity
Chemical Symbol: Fe           Melting Point: 1538*C / 2800*F
Atomic Number: 26                Boiling Point: 2862*C / 5183*F
Physical Properties

Iron in its pure form is grayish, soft, and very reactive. It’s strength comes from its alloying with other metals. Easily corrodes and rusts in both air and moisture.  An excellent conductor of heat and electricity, malleable and the most magnetic of all natural elements.
Practical Uses

The largest and most common use of iron in today’s world is the manufacturing of steel, which is used in everything from buildings, ships, cars, tools and more. As it is one of the strongest metals, and most important for alloys, it is a conundrum since it rusts so easily.

Iron was once the primary structural material but has been replaced by steel. Cast iron is still used in a variety of auto parts and plumbing manufacturers. Wrought iron is also used for cookware and for home decor.
Magical Associations/ Uses

One of the most common uses of iron in witchcraft is to repel other magics or magical creatures. It is also a dousing metal, making it useful in directing magic as well as ‘pulling’ magic from someone or something. Since it is magnetic, it can be used to attract as well as repel. Iron doesn’t hold magic well, which is why it is used to direct and redirect rather than actually holding it. As it is found in meteorites, it nearly encompasses the ideology of “as above, so below”.

Since it is magnetic, iron is an ideal metal for grounding work, as well as for astral travel. Iron can be used in rituals and spells promoting energy, determination, willpower, aggressiveness, fertility rites, speed and beginnings. It is related to the element of fire, so is good for use in any working relating to fire magic. It is a good metal to use in healing magic due to the fact that it is in our blood.

It is useful in blood magic as well. Curses commonly use iron, as well as curse removal magic, as iron deflects and redirects those energies.
Correspondences

  • Attracting and repelling
  • Directing and redirecting
  • Both the earth and celestial bodies
  • Grounding
  • Protection
  • Planet: Mars (deity as well)
  • War, power, strength
  • Courage
  • Zodiac: Aries and Scorpio
  • Healing
  • Permanence
  • Opposition to nature or the natural state of things
  • Love and lust

Alchemical Symbol


Fun Facts

Iron makes up 5.6% of the earth’s crust

Too much iron in the body can be dangerous

It is a structural constituent of the sun, stars in general and planets

Cast iron is made by heating iron alloy into a liquid then pouring it into a mold

China is the world’s largest producer of iron, accounting for 33% of the world’s iron.