Category Archives: Rosemary

Rosemary

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(Rosmarinus officinalis)

Zodiac sign: Leo, Scorpio
Planet: Sun, Moon
Element: Fire
Deities: Hebe (Greek goddess of youth), Aphrodite (Greek goddess of love)

Another favorite of Witches and cooks alike, rosemary has long been used for a wide variety of culinary, medicinal, and magical purposes. This fragrant herb tends to resemble lavender in appearance, but you can easily tell the difference between the two by rubbing the leaves with your hands, which will release the aromatic oils for easy identification. Another distinguishing characteristic is that rosemary leaves are whitish underneath and a deeper green on top, while lavender leaves tend to have a more blue-green hue. You can find dried rosemary in the spice section of any grocery store, but it’s also quite easy to grow in a garden or a kitchen window. In the ancient world, rosemary was sacred in Greece, Rome, and Egypt, and had associations with both festive and somber occasions. While the wood of the rosemary bush was used to make musical instruments, and brides wore wreaths made from the branches, Egyptians used it in embalming the dead. It was also used in funeral rites in Wales, where mourners would throw sprigs into the gravesite while the coffin was being lowered into it. In contemporary times, rosemary is used for improving circulation and warming cold arms and legs, as well as for improving the appearance of hair and skin. This herb has an all-around energetic quality of clarification, purification, and rejuvenation. Magical workings for rosemary make use of its purifying properties, particularly for eliminating negative vibrations from a physical space or one’s own person. For this reason, burning rosemary before spellwork is highly recommended, as is using an infusion of rosemary in a ritual bath prior to magical work. Alternatively, you can make a sacred water with rosemary to rinse your hands in before magic, or to purify and bless ritual tools. Combined with juniper, rosemary makes a great smudge for healing, and for clearing out any residual energies of disease in a room where someone has been ill. Other uses for rosemary include healing, protection, love, lust, retaining youth, combating jealousy, and strengthening mental clarity and focus. In love spells, rosemary is stuffed into poppets or sachets to draw new suitors. This same method can be used in spells for focusing during an examination, so rosemary is a great herb for students to make regular use of. And a fresh sprig of rosemary placed by the pillow promotes a solid night’s sleep, which is a key component in retaining one’s youthful vitality. Rosemary is also known as elf leaf, sea dew, and compass weed. As with many other potent herbs, it should not be used medicinally by pregnant women, but it’s fine to use as a seasoning on food.

Rosemary

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Rosmarinus officinalis

A fragrant herb that’s more often thought of as a culinary staple than a medicine, rosemary proves valuable during cold season, when it can be employed in soothing soups and teas that help ease sinus pain. Rosemary stimulates circulation and acts as a tonic for the central nervous system. Its scent improves memory and concentration while
providing a quick mood boost.
Parts Used: Leaves
Precautions: Do not use if you are pregnant or if you have epilepsy. Although some calming oils like jasmine,  ylangylang, chamomile, and lavender have been shown to prevent seizures, more pungent oils like rosemary, fennel, sage, eucalyptus, hyssop, camphor, and spike lavender have been known to trigger epileptic incidents.
Identifying/Growing: Rosemary is a compact shrub with fragrant, elongated leaves and strong, woody stems. Tiny flowers in shades from white to lavender emerge in late summer. While it’s not likely that you’ll find rosemary growing wild, this herb is simple to grow in a warm, sunny spot. Seeds take a long time to mature, so you may find it more convenient to purchase plants from a local nursery. Harvest the leaves early in the morning for stronger flavor and greater efficacy.

Rosemary

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ROSMARINUS OFFICINALIS

Rosemary is an exceptionally versatile essential oil, with uses that range from soothing cold and flu symptoms, to easing aches and pains. It shines as an addition to hair care products, where it can help dandruff and scalp itch. If you’re concerned about hair loss, rosemary essential oil is a must-have: A study published in Archives of Dermatology showed that a daily scalp massage with rosemary, thyme, lavender, and cedarwood essential oils blended with carrier oils resulted in 44 percent of patients showing improvement.

Precautions
Do not use during pregnancy. Rosemary is a powerful stimulant. It can keep you feeling alert for 3 to 4 hours, so avoid using it within a few hours of your usual bedtime. Do not use rosemary if you suffer from epilepsy.

Application Methods
INHALATION: Added to an essential oil inhaler or aromatherapy jewelry, 3 or 4 drops of rosemary essential oil can help you feel alert and focused when studying, driving, or doing creative work. If adding it to a diffuser, use the number of drops recommended by the diffuser’s manufacturer.
TOPICAL: Working out? Add 6 drops of rosemary essential oil to 1 teaspoon of your favorite carrier oil for a relaxing massage that soothes stiff, sore muscles.
BATH: Rosemary is a classic ingredient in natural shampoos and conditioners. Try blending it with peppermint, lavender, or lemon for a refreshing aromatherapy delight that doubles as a nourishing treatment for your scalp and hair.

Popular Uses
Create an ultra-soothing blend for aches and pains by blending rosemary essential oil with equal amounts of peppermint, thyme, and lavender for deep, penetrating comfort. A little goes a long way; dilute with at least an equal amount of carrier oil. When work or study gets intense and you really need to focus, blend 20 drops of
rosemary essential oil with 40 drops of carrier oil. Keep this blend in a roller bottle and dab it on your temples and pulse points before putting your mind to work. If you come down with a cold and need relief from congestion or a sore throat, let rosemary essential oil come to the rescue. It’s a potent antiseptic, plus its fragrance helps open up stuffy sinuses.

BLENDS WELL WITH
Basil
Bay laurel
Bergamot
Black pepper
Cedarwood
Clary sage
Clove
Frankincense
Geranium
Grapefruit
Lavender
Lemon
Lemongrass
Mandarin
Niaouli
Oregano
Peppermint
Pine
Tea tree
Thyme

SUBSTITUTE WITH
Basil
Cajeput
Oregano
Peppermint
Thyme

HEALING PROPERTIES
Analgesic
Antibacterial
Antidepressant
Antifungal
Antimicrobial
Antioxidant
Antiseptic
Antispasmodic
Astringent
Carminative
Cicatrizant
Digestive
Diuretic
Emmenagogue
Hepatic
Hypertensive
Stimulant
Sudorific
Vulnerary

IDEAL FOR TREATING
Bronchitis
Cold and flu symptoms
Dandruff
Fatigue
Indigestion
Nervousness
Sinusitis
Thinning hair
Varicose veins